Secrets of Successful Coaches with Dr. Greg Dale, Director of Sport Psychology & Leadership, Duke Athletics

Gregory A. Dale, Ph.D. is a Professor of Sport Psychology and Sport Ethics at Duke University. He is also the Director of the Sport Psychology and Leadership Programs for Duke Athletics. In addition to his work with Duke athletes and coaches, Greg consults with numerous college and professional athletes/teams as well as high school teaching and coaching staffs.

He also consults with organizations and corporations around the world including The World Bank, Habitat for Humanity International, IBM, among others. Greg has written four books related to leadership, performance, and parenting. Greg has been featured on Good Morning America, MSNBC and numerous national radio programs. He is a dynamic speaker who provides a variety of interactive and innovative workshops and on-going consulting around the country and the world.

In this interview, Greg discusses:
• The difference between winners and champions
• Secrets of successful coaches
• How coaches and leadership is an art
• Why coaches should let athletes compete through mistakes
• Why service is essential to keep center as a coach and leader

You can find more information about Greg at www.excellenceinperformance.com.

[tweet_dis2]”Culture will eat strategy for lunch everyday.” Greg Dale[/tweet_dis2]
[tweet_dis2]”Champions do things differently than winners and they do things differently from everybody else.”Greg Dale[/tweet_dis2]
[tweet_dis2]”Credibility is like a bank account, you either make deposits into that account or withdraws from it.”Greg Dale[/tweet_dis2]
[tweet_dis2]”Coaching has to be more about the people you are leading. You are here to serve them, rather than them serving you.”Greg Dale[/tweet_dis2]
[tweet_dis2]”My advice to coaches: allow people to compete through mistakes whenever possible.”Greg Dale[/tweet_dis2]
[tweet_dis2]”As coaches, you should focus on how athletes respond to the first mistake not whether they make a mistake.”Greg Dale[/tweet_dis2]
[tweet_dis2]”You have to check your ego at the door. Use ‘our team’ instead of ‘I, me, or my team.’”Greg Dale[/tweet_dis2]